Girls have bigger muscles than boys in the early years.

An image from the Body Volume technology depicting the bicep measurement.
An image from the Body Volume technology depicting the bicep measurement. 
10 March 2017

Over 18 months from March 2009 to August 2010 more than 2,500 children aged 4-17 were scanned at 12 locations across England, Scotland and Wales, to obtain a representative sample of Great Britain. Body Volume technology collated nearly 200 measurements for each child, creating reliable 3D data never previously available. This data set offers opportunities for further insight and development on body shape for retailers, sports scientists and for healthcare in due course. 


Amongst many other interesting statistics, the data shows differences between the right arm and left arm, comparing boys and girls with the average right bicep measurement being bigger than the left in both boys and girls. 


Intriguingly, biceps in girls are 3.1% bigger than boys in the early years (four-seven) but when boy’s biceps start to get bigger as their muscles develop, in teenage years (13-17) the trend is reversed and girl’s biceps are then 3.3% smaller than boys, a change of over 6%.

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